Cloistered Dreamsby Jansen Musico
Intoy Syokoy ng Kalye Marino (Calle Marino, 2012) D: Lem Lorca S: JM De Guzman, LJ Reyes, Joross Gamboa, Kenneth Salva, Arnold Reyes
Lem Lorca’s Intoy Syokoy ng Kalye Marino could be told in twenty minutes or less. That is enough time to introduce the leads and prepare the screen for the film’s melodramatic conclusion. Based on Eros Atalia’s short story of the same name, there really isn’t much to tell.
The film follows Intoy (JM De Guzman), a poor orphaned mussel diver with hopes of escaping the mundane life he’s living. Around him are a group of friends who, from the beginning, are doomed to share the same fate. Then there’s Doray (LJ Reyes), his childhood friend, who he continuously woos but rejects his advances. Lorca stretches Atalia’s material and fills the gaping voids with interspersed snippets of their stories, the collection of which plays out like an extended drama anthology episode.
The film is effectively funny at parts, sad here and there, but overall, it’s drab, with a mood that’s as murky as the waters Intoy dives into.
Though the underwater shots titillate and De Guzman and Reyes’s acting allure, there is still too much excess in the film that weighs down its potential brilliance. Too much focus is placed on the amping of misfortunes and the progression of unnecessary fillers that Intoy, as a character, is hardly every changed. He merely becomes a rickety raft we ride on throughout the whole melancholic cruise until it’s time to get off from where we started.

Cloistered Dreams
by Jansen Musico

Intoy Syokoy ng Kalye Marino (Calle Marino, 2012)
D: Lem Lorca
S: JM De Guzman, LJ Reyes, Joross Gamboa, Kenneth Salva, Arnold Reyes

Lem Lorca’s Intoy Syokoy ng Kalye Marino could be told in twenty minutes or less. That is enough time to introduce the leads and prepare the screen for the film’s melodramatic conclusion. Based on Eros Atalia’s short story of the same name, there really isn’t much to tell.

The film follows Intoy (JM De Guzman), a poor orphaned mussel diver with hopes of escaping the mundane life he’s living. Around him are a group of friends who, from the beginning, are doomed to share the same fate. Then there’s Doray (LJ Reyes), his childhood friend, who he continuously woos but rejects his advances. Lorca stretches Atalia’s material and fills the gaping voids with interspersed snippets of their stories, the collection of which plays out like an extended drama anthology episode.

The film is effectively funny at parts, sad here and there, but overall, it’s drab, with a mood that’s as murky as the waters Intoy dives into.

Though the underwater shots titillate and De Guzman and Reyes’s acting allure, there is still too much excess in the film that weighs down its potential brilliance. Too much focus is placed on the amping of misfortunes and the progression of unnecessary fillers that Intoy, as a character, is hardly every changed. He merely becomes a rickety raft we ride on throughout the whole melancholic cruise until it’s time to get off from where we started.